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Mako II Hockey Stick

Overview:

Easton kicked off the new year with new 2013 Mako products. A few days ago, they took an already successful stick and brought it to the next level. The first time I picked up the Mako II my immediate reaction was the weight, or more importantly the lack of it. Last year’s Mako weighed in at 462 grams and while it wasn’t necessarily heavy, the Mako II is noticeably lighter weighing 429 grams. Visually, Easton toned down the all-white look and brought the orange and black into the mix. I really like the look of the new Mako and when you think about it, it is is pretty smart on Easton’s part. On the forehand side, the shaft is white all the way down to the blade and the blade itself is completely black. So from a goalie‘s perspective, the white part of the shaft is harder to distinguish from the white of the ice and boards and the black blade makes it difficult to see the puck.

Easton also upgraded the proprietary woven Kevlar®/Graphite woven shaft of the 2012 Mako to the stronger, lighter and more responsive Uni-Carbon System construction. I’ll go into more detail about how this change affects the feel of the stick a little later in the blog. The 2013 Mako II also used two more ribs in the blade to both stiffen and strengthen.

Tech Specs:

  • Construction:
    • Uni-Carbon System
      • Universally aligned fibers throughout the shaft to provide a stronger and lighter shaft while improving energy transfer also
  • Flex Profile:
    • Tuned taper section built with Easton’s Elite Stiffness Profile to pro specs – Offers quick shot release and controlled puck reaction
  • Geometry:
    • Double concave side walls, and square corners
  • Grip: Matte finish
  • Blade:
    • 3K woven carbon material
    • Multi-rib design
      • Four internal ribs keep the blade stiff and accurate throughout every moment of the shot
      • Prevents the core from breaking down
    • Solid dense lower core keeps the blade in contact with the puck longer resulting great puck control and feel
    • Micro-bladder blade process - Easton’s proprietary process of producing a consistent blade
    • Non-skid blade coating
      • Better grip for the puck on exposed parts of the blade
      • Better tape adhesion and tighter wrap
  • Flex: 75, 85, and 100
  • Length: 59.5″
  • Weight: 429 Grams

Review:

(Scoring is out of 10)

Overall Score: 9

Stick Feel: 8.5

The Uni-Carbon construction that Easton uses in the Mako II makes the shaft very whippy. Personally, I prefer sticks with a stiffer feel, but I can still appreciate the whip. The shaft dimensions and the Matte finish allow for an easy grip. For those who favor the matte finish, like myself, will appreciate the slight texturing that Easton added for a firmer grip. Overall, the very lightweight Mako II felt very balanced. Finally, the low kick flex profile allows for the quickness that is the Mako Stick Line.

Puck Feel: 9.5

Once again I begin with the Uni-Carbon construction. This time, the Uni-Carbon construction is responsible for some incredible puck feel and fantastic response.

Slap Shots: 8.5

Surprisingly, the whippiness didn’t dampen the power of the clapper. The puck came off the stick very strongly; but the reason I didn’t rate the slap shot higher is because when I loaded the stick, it really did not feel normal. It’s hard to explain but while the shot itself was good, the stick didn’t feel good while taking the shot.

Wrist and Snap Shots: 9

Shooting wrist shots with the Mako II is easy: load, fire, then celebrate. The Mako is all about quickness and it truly comes out when you’re shooting. It allows for effortless shooting that still provides amazing power.

Passing: 9.5

The 4 rib design of the blade creates a stiffer and more responsive blade. By design, it could produce a blade that is too bouncy but that’s not the case here. Passing is very responsive and the puck doesn’t bounce hard off the blade. Also, my passes held strong and accurate.

Note:

Traditionally, Easton sticks aren’t the most durable sticks on the market. The 2011 RS really showed this, but the 2012 Mako partially redeemed Easton. Since this stick is brand new to the market and we haven’t been using it for an extended period of time, we aren’t able to tell you how durable this stick will be.

This stick is now available at Inline & Ice Warehouse.

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Categories: Hockey Stick Reviews